Thankful for gardening after cancer fight



As some of you may remember, in Our Readers Speak, I sent a letter alerting the world of an illness that was most grim; cancer is just not a pretty word. I tried to introduce all of you to myself and my illness and what it has involved from July 2006 until January 2007. My wife and I tried to thank everyone who were by our side which included my fellow work mates, the wonderful people at the Raleigh Regional Cancer Center, our blessed community that we live in but since learned of, and all the wonderful people that have been involved with our miraculous healing.

To remind all of you, last year in July I was diagnosed with stage four pancreatic cancer, which is also in some bones. I, at that time, was dying of cancer. So many people, in state, out of state, in church, out of church have shown through with goodness and prayers.

Beckley has the premier cancer center filled with the perfect balance of love and medical knowledge. Yes, I was given a chance to be treated at UVA, but was sent home. This is how the Raleigh Regional Cancer Center has become such a refuge for us that so desperately need it. Through all the chemo, weigh loss and other ugly things that go along with this disease, improvements are evident through my c-scans. It all appears to be working.

Today is May; gardening season has come upon us. Last year in the harvest of September, I felt a desire to throw away everything that dealt with gardening. But with the love and prayers of my wonderful wife and encouragement of family and friends, I hung them up instead.

I am here at gardening season unexpectedly. Thanks to everyone — medical professionals, fellow patients, neighbors, family, friends, and continued support from Allegheny Restoration and Builders.

I am learning a new way to garden with some new tools. My blessed disease has given me new ways to plant love, and with the love and prayers of everyone, I hope I can return this love in a most fruitful manner. Thank you is never enough, I know. Most of all, thank God for a new garden season because today I am learning to live with cancer instead of dying of cancer. Thanks, everyone, for your continued prayers.



Charlie Manning

Beckley



Hospice House is great benefit to community



The best thing that has come to Beckley in many a year is the Doug and Lucy Bowers Hospice House. One can see upon entering the 12-bed house that a lot of thought and planning went into the design and construction of this facility. The rooms are spacious, have plenty of windows to let the sunshine in and French doors to let the sun in or the patients out on the walkway. The rooms are well decorated, brightly painted and in no way resemble a drab hospital room. However, the best thing about the Hospice House and Hospice of Southern West Virginia is its staff.

My wife was recently a patient at the Doug and Lucy Bowers Hospice House. When she was admitted, the staff informed us that they wanted to make our stay as much like home as possible; not only did they achieve that atmosphere but far exceeded it as we felt like part of a big family. My grandson, upon leaving one day after visiting his nanny, told my daughter he didn’t want to leave paradise.

The medical and sanitary care my wife received during her stay was above any that I have seen. The nurses and certified nurse assistants allowed my wife’s last days to be filled with dignity and an exceptional quality of life. When my wife passed away, the nurse was in the room grieving with us and the Hospice personnel who took care of my wife at home, before being admitted to the Hospice House, were at her funeral.

The entire staff of Hospice of Southern West Virginia and the Doug and Lucy Bowers Hospice House should be commended for the job they are doing, and Beckley should be proud to have such loving and caring citizens in their community. If you need a charity to give to, this one is really worth your consideration.



Michael Bolen

Beckley

0
0
0
0
0

This Week's Circulars