The Register-Herald, Beckley, West Virginia

Local News

December 13, 2012

Three enter pleas in Raleigh Circuit Court

BECKLEY — Three men entered guilty pleas in Raleigh County Circuit Court Wednesday before Judge Robert A. Burnside.

Richard Tanner, 41, of Beaver, pleaded guilty to DUI, third offense.

Raleigh County Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Tom Truman said Burnside gave Tanner a sentence of one-year home monitored confinement.

Jason Paul Lytton, 35, formerly of Princewick, pleaded guilty to breaking and entering and conspiracy to distribute narcotics.

Truman said a Crab Orchard Pharmacy employee told Lytton and an accomplice where the narcotics were located. The two broke a window with a cinderblock, entered the pharmacy and stole narcotics.

In another incident, Truman said Lytton and two other suspects stole $2,100 worth of DVDs from Sam’s Club. Lytton will be sentenced Feb. 15.

Michael Dewayne Napper, 33, formerly of Beckley, currently housed in St. Mary’s Correctional Facility, pleaded guilty to forgery, robbery and malicious assault in three unrelated incidents.

Truman said Napper stole a credit card, went to a local store and forged a woman’s signature on the sales slip in July 2011.

Within months, Truman said Napper and a woman were driving in Beckley. They saw a man walking and Napper told the woman to offer the man a ride. The man refused, and Napper assaulted him and took his wallet. The pair then bought gift cards they exchanged for drugs.

Napper’s probation was revoked last December and he was sent to Southern Regional Jail. While at SRJ, he argued with guards, then  hit two of them and injured one.

Burnside sentenced him to one to 10 years for forgery, 10 years for robbery and two to 10 years for the malicious assault, which will be served concurrently.

Napper will be eligible for parole in June 2014.

— E-mail: wholdren@register-herald.com

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