The Register-Herald, Beckley, West Virginia

Editorials

January 20, 2013

Thanks

 

He wasn’t from West Virginia.

He didn’t have to be here.

But Jay Rockefeller chose to become a West Virginian.

As his surname suggests, Jay came from wealth but thrust himself into a small West Virginia mining community as a 27-year-old VISTA volunteer.

From there, he fell in love with the state and its people and dedicated himself to a life of serving them.

As a volunteer.

A state delegate.

Secretary of State.

A college president.

Governor.

Senator.

Last week, Rockefeller announced that he will not seek re-election at the end of his fifth term in the Senate.

His legacy is vast.

He is known as an advocate for accessible health care and miners’ safety.

He played an instrumental role in expanding our state’s economic opportunities.

He co-authored legislation to improve education for children.

He has targeted television violence and obscenity along with Internet security.

His support for our nation’s soldiers and veterans is well-documented.

Rockefeller’s position as the chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation; chairman of the Health Care Subcommittee on Finance and being a member of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence while serving on the Senate Committee on Veterans’ Affairs has given him a strong voice in Washington in several vitally important affairs.

Despite the silver spoon status that may have come his way as a great-grandson to oil tycoon John D. Rockefeller, Jay was just Jay to thousands of West Virginians.

By humbling himself to serve others in public office, his legacy will be much taller than even the lanky, bespectacled senator himself.

It will be one of representing West Virginia’s — and even the nation’s — middle class in a manner that improved the lives of several generations.

With two more years remaining in office, Jay will likely cement his heritage even more.

At a height of over 6 feet 6 inches, Jay will forever stand tall in West Virginia and United States history.

Leaving some quite sizable shoes to fill in 2014.

1
Text Only
Editorials
  • Missing from the show

    If they attended, lawmakers would see strides made by TWV

    July 31, 2014

  • VA breakthrough

    Compromise shows Congress can put partisanship aside for the proper cause

    July 30, 2014

  • Doughnut holes

    Annexation benefits outweigh the taxes

    July 29, 2014

  • The play’s the thing

    TWV twins reveal local riches that can’t be found anywhere else

    July 27, 2014

  • Primary care

    DHHR program weans folks away from the ER

    July 24, 2014

  • Rain? What Rain?

    Community still enjoys auto fair despite uncooperative weather

    July 23, 2014

  • Do tell

    It’s hard to keep a secret in today’s here-a-camera, there-a-camera, everywhere-a-camera world. Whatever one does that is embarrassing is immediately posted on YouTube, Facebook or other social media of choice.

    July 22, 2014

  • Juvenile justice

    West Virginia nearly doubled the rate it sent youths to juvenile facilities from 1997 to 2011, in contrast to declining rates of youthful incarceration elsewhere in the United States.

    July 20, 2014

  • Thumbs — Saturday, July 19, 2014

    July 19, 2014

  • Do something

     Johnstown police have charged three men in the brutal murder early Sunday of a city academy student.

    July 18, 2014